To become one of the best you must study the best. Character design takes patience, practice, and dedication. David Colman is an illustrator, who has worked countless hours perfecting the skill. He knows the ins and outs of what it takes to be the best. Within his book, The Art of Animal Character Design, Colman explores the methods, philosophies and secrets of the animal character design industry. He shows his process on how to use the knowledge obtained from studying an actual trade craft. The book contains both his professional and personal work for you to study and learn from. I highly recommend looking into his process and this book.

Check out David Colman’s book on Amazon!

To become one of the best you must study the best. Character design takes patience, practice, and dedication. David Colman is an illustrator, who has worked countless hours perfecting the skill. He knows the ins and outs of what it takes to be the best.

Within his book, The Art of Animal Character Design, Colman explores the methods, philosophies and secrets of the animal character design industry. He shows his process on how to use the knowledge obtained from studying an actual trade craft. The book contains both his professional and personal work for you to study and learn from. I highly recommend looking into his process and this book.



Check out David Colman’s book on Amazon!

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt

Over time the role of the graphic designer has continually grown and expanded. Serving originally as hired help providing a professional service, the role of the designer has evolved into more empowering roles of authorship embracing social, cultural, political and economic issues of importance. In his book, “The Designer As…,” Steven McCarthy tells the story of how designers currently seek opportunities to combine form, function content, and meaning in their work and how they’ve taken on different roles as authors and producers. McCarthy, a professor of graphic design at the University of Minnesota, has had creative work published in Graphis Poster, the American Institute of Graphic Arts annual, HOW, Page and in Provocative Graphics: The Power of the Unexpected in Graphic Design, among many others. His work has also been in over ninety juried and invitational exhibitions. He will be paying a visit to Kent State for a lecture and book signing Thursday, March 20 at 7pm in the First Energy Auditorium in Franklin Hall. Steven will also hold a workshop the following day for Visual Communication Design students, Friday, March 21 from 10am to 12:30pm at the Glyphix office, 138 E. Main St. in Downtown Kent. Steven’s book, “The Designer As…: Author, Producer, Activist, Entrepreneur, Curator, and Collaborator: New Models for Communicating,” will be available for purchase the night of the lecture from the Kent State University Bookstore for $32.

Over time the role of the graphic designer has continually grown and expanded. Serving originally as hired help providing a professional service, the role of the designer has evolved into more empowering roles of authorship embracing social, cultural, political and economic issues of importance. In his book, “The Designer As…,” Steven McCarthy tells the story of how designers currently seek opportunities to combine form, function content, and meaning in their work and how they’ve taken on different roles as authors and producers.

McCarthy, a professor of graphic design at the University of Minnesota, has had creative work published in Graphis Poster, the American Institute of Graphic Arts annual, HOW, Page and in Provocative Graphics: The Power of the Unexpected in Graphic Design, among many others. His work has also been in over ninety juried and invitational exhibitions. He will be paying a visit to Kent State for a lecture and book signing Thursday, March 20 at 7pm in the First Energy Auditorium in Franklin Hall. Steven will also hold a workshop the following day for Visual Communication Design students, Friday, March 21 from 10am to 12:30pm at the Glyphix office, 138 E. Main St. in Downtown Kent.

Steven’s book, “The Designer As…: Author, Producer, Activist, Entrepreneur, Curator, and Collaborator: New Models for Communicating,” will be available for purchase the night of the lecture from the Kent State University Bookstore for $32.

Glyphix students Joey Kirkpatrick and Jamie Lefevre have been working on a very special project for the past few months, a website and identity design for “@Infinitum (create+lead+learn).” “@Infintum” is an art exchange exhibition that will be hosted in both China by Hebei Normal University and the United States by Kent State University. Thirty-six participants are working together to create a collective art exhibit. The first portion of the exhibit will be opening this may in China. Recently, in the midst of their designing their identity, Jamie and Joey were asked by their contact to attempt creating a Chinese version of their logo. Jamie shares a bit about the process:

“I’m fortunate enough to have a long-time friend, Blythe Worstell, who is trilingual and recently studied abroad in China, so I was able to use her as a consultant with some of my initial research for this logo conversion. Blythe pointed out that Chinese typefaces have a classification, called Gothic, that is similar to sans-serif typefaces. Gothic typefaces are noted for their even stroke weights, minimal curves, and lack of decorative elements. Prior to this conversation, I hadn’t closely examined a Chinese typeface, so it has been a fun learning experiment thus far.”

Glyphix students Joey Kirkpatrick and Jamie Lefevre have been working on a very special project for the past few months, a website and identity design for “@Infinitum (create+lead+learn).” “@Infintum” is an art exchange exhibition that will be hosted in both China by Hebei Normal University and the United States by Kent State University. Thirty-six participants are working together to create a collective art exhibit. The first portion of the exhibit will be opening this may in China.

Recently, in the midst of their designing their identity, Jamie and Joey were asked by their contact to attempt creating a Chinese version of their logo. Jamie shares a bit about the process:

“I’m fortunate enough to have a long-time friend, Blythe Worstell, who is trilingual and recently studied abroad in China, so I was able to use her as a consultant with some of my initial research for this logo conversion. Blythe pointed out that Chinese typefaces have a classification, called Gothic, that is similar to sans-serif typefaces. Gothic typefaces are noted for their even stroke weights, minimal curves, and lack of decorative elements. Prior to this conversation, I hadn’t closely examined a Chinese typeface, so it has been a fun learning experiment thus far.”
Our #throwbackthursday this week takes us back 23 years to February ‘91!

Our #throwbackthursday this week takes us back 23 years to February ‘91!

At some point in our lives, we become sorted into one of two categories: “creatives” or “practical people”. During this sorting, someone convinced these “practical people” that they’re unable to thrive in the creative realm. However, innovation doesn’t discriminate between the two.

If we keep letting fears deter us from trying something new, we will continue to hinder the process of creating something great. All it takes is turning fear into familiarity, as David Kelley points out in his TED Talk, “How to build your creative confidence”. Take the 12 minutes out of your day to watch this video, and if you like what you hear, check out the book “Creative Confidence” written by David and his brother, Tom.

Kent State University’s IdeaBase and Glyphix continue their award-winning status by receiving American Advertising Federation (AAF) ADDY Awards for outstanding work in 2013. The AAF Student American Advertising Awards Competition is a unique national awards program designed specially for college students.

IdeaBase (formerly The Tannery) is no stranger to producing award-winning solutions for clients. This year the organization is recognized for work completed for The Kent State University College of Communication and Information, the CCI Commons Living and Learning Community, and for the CCI School of Communication Studies.

Glyphix, celebrating 40 years with over 40 ADDY awards earned in that time, was also recognized. This year’s award-winning projects include work produced for the Wick Poetry Center (Traveling Stanzas), Roughs (this blog!), and the Kent State School of Visual Communication Design. Some of the work from both IdeaBase and Glyphix are featured below.

This is a moment for the students of IdeaBase and Glyphix to be very proud of. It is an especially proud moment for me, having just wrapped up a year of pulling double duty as Creative Director of IdeaBase, and as Glyphix Project manager (first under Creative Director Valora Renicker, and currently, Sarah Rutherford). The past year of guiding and working alongside some of Kent State’s most talented students has been an incredible experience, and this recognition adds to that. Congratulations, students!

"Traveling Stanzas" posters designed by Peni Acayo ("Speak"), Megan Bush ("My Hero"), Brent Carlson ("Lullaby") and Anthony Jandrokovic ("On the Morning, 9/11").

"VCD Poster Series" designed by Tyler Federico, Larrie King and Emily Rabatsky.

"VCD Roughs Postcard Series" designed by Alicia Jordan and Vanessa Port.

As week two comes to a close, we’d like to take a minute to reflect upon something near and dear to our hearts: the Art Building. This semester marks phase one of our transition to Taylor Hall.

Because of the brand new space built for VCD in the MACC Annex, much of our furniture needed to be moved to these newer classrooms, leaving our soon-to-be-42-year-old fiberglass palace a bit bare.

"After spending infinite hours in this home away from home, it feels bittersweet to see it slowly becoming barren. There’s something about the constant hum of pipes and periodic leak of ceiling that has charmed me throughout these past four years. However, I’m looking forward to starting fresh, and I think future students will enjoy our (eventual) new home in the top of Taylor.

Here’s to new beginnings!”

—Jamie Lefevre

What are some of your favorite memories from the Kent State Art Building?

This is our last post before the new year! To celebrate and inspire, we are featuring the illustrator Salli Swindell from Hudson, Ohio. Salli is one of the creators of They Draw and Cook and They Draw and Travel. She does many pattern designs, especially holiday ones. Enjoy and have a nice break!Click here to look at her personal blog.Click here to look at Studio SSS blog. 

This is our last post before the new year! To celebrate and inspire, we are featuring the illustrator Salli Swindell from Hudson, Ohio. Salli is one of the creators of They Draw and Cook and They Draw and Travel. She does many pattern designs, especially holiday ones. Enjoy and have a nice break!

Click here to look at her personal blog.
Click here to look at Studio SSS blog.